Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Opening Blog-tour

Hi all! Today I welcome Stephen Tremp to MFB. He's here to tell us about exploding stars, black holes and Opening, his newly released novel.

Thanks for stopping by, Stephen.

Thank you Misha for hosting me on this, my final stop on the Grand OPENING Tour! I’m honored. I thought we would close things out with a bang, and what bigger bang can we imagine than an exploding star.

A Supernova: is an explosion of a massive supergiant star. It shines with the brightness of up to ten billion suns and is one of the most energetic explosions in the universe. Scientists believe supernovae happen in our Milky Way galaxy about once or twice a century. Supernovae are classified as a Type I Supernova or Type II supernova depending on the shape of their light curves and the nature of their spectra. In less than a second, a neutron star or a black hole is born. Supernovae explosions are not merely the death of a star. These massive explosions seed the universe with heavy elements (muy importante) that help to make up new stars, planets, and everything on earth, including you and me.

Black Hole: Any object whose escape velocity exceeds the speed of light. With each black hole there is a point of no return called the event horizon. Picture Niagara Falls. You see someone caught in the river heading toward the falls. If he is far enough away he can swim to the shore. But there is a point where the current is too strong and the swimmer cannot escape. He is going over no matter how much energy he expends to swim to the shore. This is similar to the Event Horizon of a black hole. Even light cannot escape a black hole. That's what makes it black.

Fun Theories (no fun facts here as we have yet to actually observe a black hole): There are two types of black holes. Stellar Black Holes form from collapsed stars. It is possible for black holes to collide and form larger black holes. It is believed by many physicists and astronomers that super massive black holes, called Galactic Black Holes, reside at the center of each galaxy. These can be as large as hundreds of thousands to billions of solar masses.

Fun Theory: Physicists also believe there may be rogue black holes cruising (not stationary) around the universe. I hope one doesn't cross our solar system. That would be a bad day for us.

Fun Theory: Some believe you can enter a Black Hole and emerge out the other side in another place and time. Black Hole = Time Machine. But in all probability, you would die before going through.

Fun Theory: Mini black holes are theoretically possible, but have yet to be created in a laboratory. At least, that the general public is aware of. Recently a lawsuit was brought against CERN for fear their research could bring about the end of the world, possibly by man-made mini-black holes. Thank again to Misha for hosting me today. And thank you all for supporting me on the Grand OPENING Tour. I could not have done this without you!

Insert Cheesy Self Promotion: Finally, tomorrow’s my birthday, or today, depending on which day you’re reading this. It’s March 22nd. If you feel so inspired to get me something, outside of a brand new 2012 souped-up turbo 3000 Wormhole with racing stripes, you can download either or both my books BREAKTHROUGH and OPENING at Amazon Kindle. At a buck ninety-nine each, you can’t beat it with a stick! They're also available for download at SMASHWORDS Thanks again everyone. You’ve been great! Next up is the Grand OPENING Tour Roundup on Friday, then the A to Z Challenge. Remember to visit me at Breakthrough Blogs!

29 comments:

  1. Thanks Misha for hosting me. And thanks everyone for coming by and saying hello! This is a topic that gets a lot of play on the Discovery and Science Channels because its so popular. Its amazing so many people are fascinated by black holes.

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  2. Pretty crazy stuff out there. I'm all for the black hole that would take a person through time. Who wants to jump in first? But then how would we know if it worked if the person disappeared?


    Lee
    An A to Z Co-Host
    Tossing It Out
    Twitter: @AprilA2Z
    #atozchallenge

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  3. You are one busy man, Stephen. I vote against creating black holes. They sound way too dangerous. I tend to be a scaredy cat, though.

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  4. What fascinating information. I am just spell bound reading it. Thank you Misha... and thank you Stephen!!! Keep up the great work!!!

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  5. I think the idea of the black hole has fascinated people for a long time. I know I have always thought it would be cool to be transported to some other time and dimension, but only if I could come back after my vacation. LOL

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  6. I love the science posts Stephen! I always feel like I learn something new.

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  7. Some days, I must admit, I'm need of a black hole to swallow me up. :)

    Happy Birthday tomorrow!

    Teresa

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  8. Yes, crushed to death seems more likely. However, that would ruin the ending of Disney's The Black Hole, now wouldn't it?

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  9. Thanks everyone for stopping by! You've all been great! There's only so much I can do in 500 words so I encourage people to Google these topics. There's so much available at our fingertips.

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  10. Oh, interesting stuff! I'm curious what you know about whether the Mayan prediction is related to passing near enough to a black hole to shift our poles... Any truth to that?

    Good luck with your book launch! I hope it's going great! And happy birthday!

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  11. Intriguing these black holes, though I am daft when it comes to scientific theories, my nerdy brother does a good job of explaining stuff...like when decades ago, he ruined my day dreams by pointing out that the day/night sky is filled with stars long dead. ;( By the way, I bought your book Breakthrough today through Amazon, but it will be probably May when I can read it.

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  12. Nuffin' cheesy about your self-promotion, buddy!

    Love the sci-geek info and especially the theories. I have a mini black hole in my purse. What goes in is never seen again. Especially money.

    Marian Allen
    Fantasies, mysteries, comedies, recipes

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  13. With all the doomsday predicitons for 2012 I think people's interests are especially aroused regarding things like black holes and wormholes. Not sure what the connection is. But there seems to be one.

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  14. What a fun post. I reallynenjoyed that and loved the humor in your post post Stephen. I also fell for the cheesy self promotion after reading this. I was watching national droves hive the aother day and they weremtalking about the gravitational force and this magnetic layer that is formed around the earth by it's rotation which protects us from the impact of being blasted to smitherings by magnetic storms let off by the sun. The theory is that the poles change every couple pf thousands or hrundreds if thiusands of years and we are over due for that change which would make north south and south north. And in that time of that change happening that's when the protective layer of the earth is weak and if there just happens be one of those storms we're omen. Couldnthat be the much spoken of omegadon. According to this documentary, this is how planets like mars which use to reseble earth became what they are.

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  15. Oooh, I saw another interview with Stephen a couple weeks ago. Thanks for reminding me about his books!

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  16. Thanks Stephen and Misha, what an interesting post to read! Some great theories amongst it!

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  17. It's amazing what's happening way up there when we look at the stars at night. They look so small, yet they're actually very big and very far away, too far for me to ever get to!

    Morgan Mandel
    http://morganmandel.blogspot.com

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  18. Hi Misha & Stephen!

    There were two visible supernovae last summer [through telescopes], both in other galaxies. One was in the Whirlpool Galaxy, just below the handle of the Big Dipper--23 million light years away. The other was in the Pinwheel Galaxy, @35 million light years away--just above the handle of the Big Dipper. They were as bright as stars in our own galaxy in the telescopes. Really cool!

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  19. That was a fun post! It's amazing what's out there in our universe, and oh, the possibilities!

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  20. I'm a sucker for wormholes. They play a big role in several of my favorite sci-fi/fantasy TV series!

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  21. It's the 22nd where I am, so happy birthday :-)

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  22. Stephen, this was a great guest post for wrapping up your Grand OPENING Tour. You've made learning about wormholes, Supernovae, and all other things about space both fun and interesting. Why couldn't my science teachers make learning all things science fun?

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Enjoy your special day.

    Susanne
    PUTTING WORDS DOWN ON PAPER

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  23. Some of you are in different time zones and have reminded me the 22nd has already arrived. Somewhere. Maybe not here yet. But somewhere. So time to start celebrating!

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  24. Hi Stephen and Misha .. great tour you've had Stephen - we all get a bird's eye view of wormholes and a greater understanding of stars et al ... thanks for all the info you give us ..

    Good luck with Opening - I enjoyed Breakthrough and look forward to reading Opening and Escalation in due course ..

    Cheers to you both - Hilary

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  25. Hey Misha. Nice to meet you, Stephan. Interesting facts - would love to see a Supernova! Will check out your blog :) X

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  26. What a fun post. Stephen, do you like Neil deGrasse Tyson? I love listening to him and he has a book out right now regarding space exploration.

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  27. Firstly, Happy Birthday Stephen.
    10 billion suns? That's bright and quite a contrast to black holes.
    Thanks Misha for having Stephen aboard, he is fascinating about astronomy,a subject I know little about.
    Good luck with Doorways.

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  28. Thanks Misha for hosting me on the last leg of my tour! I'll Tweet this one more time and hopefully bring a few more people by.

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  29. thats really cool, thanks for the pictures and perfect description

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